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United States

News

October 17, 2018

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met on Wednesday with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, trying to resolve the international uproar over the alleged killing of a journalist inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, and said that Saudi officials had promised consequences for anyone—even a member of the royal family—found responsible.

Opinion

October 17, 2018

The Americas

News

October 17, 2018

Canada Now World’s Largest Legal Marijuana Marketplace

By Gene Johnson & Rob Gillies | Associated Press

Canada became the largest country with a legal national marijuana marketplace as sales began early Wednesday in Newfoundland. And there was more good news for pot aficionados: Hours before a handful of retail outlets opened in the country’s easternmost province a federal official told The Associated Press that Canada will pardon all those with convictions for possessing up to 30 grams of marijuana, the now-legal threshold.

More from WPR: All Eyes Are on Canada, the Biggest Country Yet to Legalize Marijuana

Brazil’s Temer Charged With Corruption, Money Laundering

By Mauricio Savarese | Associated Press

Brazil’s federal police filed new charges against President Michel Temer on Tuesday, recommending he be put on trial for corruption, money laundering and criminal association for allegedly taking bribes to favor port management companies.

About 20 Cuban diplomats and supporters disrupted a U.N. meeting called Tuesday by the United States to spotlight the island nation’s political prisoners, loudly banging on tables and shouting in Spanish, “Cuba, yes! U.S. blockade, no!”

Opinion

October 17, 2018

Europe

News

October 17, 2018

Russian Official: Student Gunman Killed 17 at Crimea College

By Vladimir Isachenkov & Nataliya Vasilyeva | Associated Press

A Russian official said a student attacked a vocational college Wednesday in Crimea, a rampage that killed 17 other students and left more than 40 people wounded, before killing himself.

Opinion

October 17, 2018

The Ghosts of 1918

By Jacob Heilbrunn | The National Interest

One hundred years after the end of World War I, international affairs appear in many ways to be coming full circle.

Africa

News

October 17, 2018

Congo’s government accused Angolan authorities of violently expelling thousands of its citizens during a crackdown on artisanal diamond mining, but Angola said it had acted lawfully to protect is resources.

Middle East & North Africa

News

October 17, 2018

The Jamal Khashoggi Case: Suspects Had Ties to Saudi Crown Prince

By David D. Kirkpatrick, Malachy Browne, Ben Hubbard & David Botti | The New York Times

One of the suspects identified by Turkey in the disappearance of the Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi was a frequent companion of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman — seen disembarking from airplanes with him in Paris and Madrid and photographed standing guard during his visits this year to Houston, Boston and the United Nations.

More from WPR: The Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi and a Crown Prince’s False Promise

Gaza Rocket Hits Home in Israel, Military Strikes Back

By Aron Heller | Associated Press

A rocket fired from Gaza struck a residential home in southern Israel early Wednesday and the Israeli military began attacking militant sites in Gaza in response after days of rising tensions.

Opinion

October 17, 2018

Asia-Pacific

News

October 17, 2018

Indian Minister Accused of Sexual Harassment Steps Down

By Ashok Sharma & Emily Schmall | Associated Press

M.J. Akbar, India’s junior external affairs minister, resigned Wednesday amid accusations by 20 women of sexual harassment during his previous career as one of the country’s most prominent news editors, becoming the most powerful man to fall in India’s burgeoning #MeToo movement.

Key Allies Quit Duterte Cabinet to Run in Elections

By Jim Gomez | Associated Press

Close allies of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte have resigned from his Cabinet to run in elections next year that will test his popularity and could determine his future political influence.

Opinion

October 17, 2018

Xi Jinping’s Debt Trap

By Gordon G. Chang | The National Interest

President Donald Trump’s “trade war”—the imposition of tariffs—has the potential for shaking the export-dependent Chinese economy.

United States

News

October 17, 2018

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met on Wednesday with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey, trying to resolve the international uproar over the alleged killing of a journalist inside the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, and said that Saudi officials had promised consequences for anyone—even a member of the royal family—found responsible.

U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross on Wednesday criticized the European Union for moving too slowly in trade talks and warned that President Donald Trump’s patience with the Europeans might soon run out.

Opinion

October 17, 2018

News

October 16, 2018

U.S. Sanctions Give Russian Economy an Unintended Boost

By Avantika Chilkoti | The Wall Street Journal (subscription required)

U.S. sanctions have driven the price of oil and the ruble apart—leaving Russia with expensive crude and a cheaper currency, a combination that is helping its economy.

Trump Warns Honduras Over Migrant Caravan Now in Guatemala

By Sonia Perez D. | Associated Press

U.S. President Donald Trump threatened Tuesday to cut aid to Honduras if it doesn’t stop a caravan of some 2,000 migrants, even as they resumed their northward trek through Guatemala with hopes of reaching the U.S. border.

Opinion

October 16, 2018

Is Trump’s Iran Policy Meant to Start a War?

By Trita Parsi & Sina Azodi | The National Interest

If Trump’s bet proves wrong and the theocracy in Tehran shows itself too resilient, then the United States will find itself in a vulnerable position.

News

October 15, 2018

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Monday designated five groups, including the Lebanese Hezbollah and the Central American street gang MS-13, as “top transnational organized crime threats,” targeting them for stepped up prosecutions by the Justice Department.

The Americas

News

October 17, 2018

Canada Now World’s Largest Legal Marijuana Marketplace

By Gene Johnson & Rob Gillies | Associated Press

Canada became the largest country with a legal national marijuana marketplace as sales began early Wednesday in Newfoundland. And there was more good news for pot aficionados: Hours before a handful of retail outlets opened in the country’s easternmost province a federal official told The Associated Press that Canada will pardon all those with convictions for possessing up to 30 grams of marijuana, the now-legal threshold.

More from WPR: All Eyes Are on Canada, the Biggest Country Yet to Legalize Marijuana

Brazil’s Temer Charged With Corruption, Money Laundering

By Mauricio Savarese | Associated Press

Brazil’s federal police filed new charges against President Michel Temer on Tuesday, recommending he be put on trial for corruption, money laundering and criminal association for allegedly taking bribes to favor port management companies.

About 20 Cuban diplomats and supporters disrupted a U.N. meeting called Tuesday by the United States to spotlight the island nation’s political prisoners, loudly banging on tables and shouting in Spanish, “Cuba, yes! U.S. blockade, no!”

Opinion

October 17, 2018

News

October 16, 2018
October 15, 2018

Europe

News

October 17, 2018

Russian Official: Student Gunman Killed 17 at Crimea College

By Vladimir Isachenkov & Nataliya Vasilyeva | Associated Press

A Russian official said a student attacked a vocational college Wednesday in Crimea, a rampage that killed 17 other students and left more than 40 people wounded, before killing himself.

Outburst of Firebrand Far-Left French Leader Prompts Probe

By Thomas Adamson | Associated Press

French far-left leader Jean-Luc Melenchon has built a career on his firebrand oratory. But the 2017 presidential candidate’s famously acid tongue has now landed him in trouble, with prosecutors going after the leader of the France Unbowed party for verbally savaging anti-corruption investigators.

Opinion

October 17, 2018

The Ghosts of 1918

By Jacob Heilbrunn | The National Interest

One hundred years after the end of World War I, international affairs appear in many ways to be coming full circle.

News

October 16, 2018

With a general election on the horizon, Portugal’s government is promising a financial windfall after years of austerity. The center-left Socialist government’s 2019 budget proposal unveiled Tuesday offered lower taxes, higher pay for government workers, pension increases, more jobs, and lower energy and public transport prices.

More from WPR: As Europe Moves Right, Portugal Veers Left—and Thrives

Armenia’s prime minister stepped down Tuesday, a political maneuver aimed at forcing an early election. Nikol Pashinian, who took office in May after spearheading weeks of protests that forced the resignation of his predecessor, has pushed for an early parliamentary election this fall in a bid to unseat foes who maintain a majority.

More from WPR: Armenia’s Changing Political Winds Threaten a Rare Moment of Stability

Opinion

October 16, 2018

How Putin’s Favorite Biker Gang Infiltrated NATO

By Mitchell A. Orenstein & Peter Kreko | Foreign Affairs

This summer, Moscow’s hybrid war on the West took an unexpected twist: a pro-Russian paramilitary established a base, disguised as a biker gang headquarters, a little over an hour from Bratislava, Slovakia—well within the borders of NATO itself.

News

October 15, 2018

A Moroccan man convicted of helping Mohamed Atta and the other Hamburg-based Sept. 11 suicide pilots as they plotted attacks on New York and Washington was deported Monday from Germany to his homeland.

Africa

News

October 17, 2018

Congo’s government accused Angolan authorities of violently expelling thousands of its citizens during a crackdown on artisanal diamond mining, but Angola said it had acted lawfully to protect is resources.

October 16, 2018

Zimbabwe’s Vice President Constantino Chiwenga is receiving treatment in South Africa for injuries sustained in a bombing in June at a campaign rally for President Emmerson Mnangagwa, state newspaper the Herald reported on Monday.

October 15, 2018

Middle East & North Africa

News

October 17, 2018

The Jamal Khashoggi Case: Suspects Had Ties to Saudi Crown Prince

By David D. Kirkpatrick, Malachy Browne, Ben Hubbard & David Botti | The New York Times

One of the suspects identified by Turkey in the disappearance of the Saudi dissident Jamal Khashoggi was a frequent companion of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman — seen disembarking from airplanes with him in Paris and Madrid and photographed standing guard during his visits this year to Houston, Boston and the United Nations.

More from WPR: The Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi and a Crown Prince’s False Promise

Gaza Rocket Hits Home in Israel, Military Strikes Back

By Aron Heller | Associated Press

A rocket fired from Gaza struck a residential home in southern Israel early Wednesday and the Israeli military began attacking militant sites in Gaza in response after days of rising tensions.

The International Criminal Court’s chief prosecutor issued a warning Wednesday that if Israel goes ahead and destroys a Palestinian Bedouin village on the West Bank that could constitute a war crime.

Opinion

October 17, 2018

News

October 16, 2018

Saudis May Admit Khashoggi Was Killed in Interrogation by Mistake

By Gardiner Harris, David D. Kirkpatrick & Eileen Sullivan | The New York Times

Saudi Arabia was preparing an alternative explanation of the fate of a dissident journalist on Monday, saying he died at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul two weeks ago in an interrogation gone wrong, according to a person familiar with the kingdom’s plans. In Washington, President Trump echoed the possibility that Jamal Khashoggi was the victim of “rogue killers.”

More from WPR: The Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi and a Crown Prince’s False Promise

Egypt has extended its state of emergency for another three months. The government declared a state of emergency after an Islamic State affiliate bombed two Coptic churches in April 2017, killing at least 44 people, and it has been renewed once before.

Opinion

October 16, 2018

Pastor Brunson Is Free. But the West Still Needs a Policy on Erdogan’s Hostages

By Aykan Erdemir & Merve Tahiroglu | The Washington Post

The two-year saga of Brunson’s case clearly illustrates Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s grip on his country’s justice system, and the direct power that he holds over Turkish court proceedings. Erdogan has used that power to pursue a policy of “hostage diplomacy,” using Western prisoners to extract concessions in exchange for their liberty.

News

October 15, 2018

An Algerian television station close to President Abdelaziz Bouteflika’s family reports that five senior Algerian army officers have been jailed after appearing before a magistrate on corruption charges.

Syria Reopens Vital Crossing With Jordan, U.N. Post With Golan

By Albert Aji & Omar Akour | Associated Press

President Bashar Assad’s government received a major boost Monday as Syria’s commercial gateway with Jordan and a crossing with the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights manned by U.N peacekeepers were reopened years after the war disrupted their operations.

Egyptian President Arrives in Russia

By AP Editors | Associated Press

Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi has arrived in Russia on a visit expected to further boost ties between the two nations.

Asia-Pacific

News

October 17, 2018

Indian Minister Accused of Sexual Harassment Steps Down

By Ashok Sharma & Emily Schmall | Associated Press

M.J. Akbar, India’s junior external affairs minister, resigned Wednesday amid accusations by 20 women of sexual harassment during his previous career as one of the country’s most prominent news editors, becoming the most powerful man to fall in India’s burgeoning #MeToo movement.

Key Allies Quit Duterte Cabinet to Run in Elections

By Jim Gomez | Associated Press

Close allies of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte have resigned from his Cabinet to run in elections next year that will test his popularity and could determine his future political influence.

The doors to Kerala’s Sabarimala temple opened on Wednesday for the first time since the Supreme Court three weeks ago allowed women of all ages to enter the hilltop shrine, but female devotees were halted by a wall of resistance mounted by traditionalists who tuned them away, intimidated journalists and clashed with the police.

The prime minister has signaled that he could accept New Zealand’s longstanding offer to resettle 150 refugees exiled to Pacific islands as long as the Australian Parliament legislates to ban them from ever setting foot in Australia.

Opinion

October 17, 2018

Xi Jinping’s Debt Trap

By Gordon G. Chang | The National Interest

President Donald Trump’s “trade war”—the imposition of tariffs—has the potential for shaking the export-dependent Chinese economy.

News

October 16, 2018

China Party Expels General Who Killed Self, Indicts Another

By Christopher Bodeen | Associated Press

China’s ruling Communist Party has expelled a former top general who killed himself during a corruption probe and indicted another on graft charges amid President Xi Jinping’s continuing crackdown on military malfeasance.

The rival Koreas and the U.S.-led United Nations Command met Tuesday to discuss efforts to disarm a military zone the rivals control within their shared border under a peace agreement between the two countries.

Australia Considers Moving Embassy to Jerusalem

By Rod McGuirk | Associated Press

Australia has raised the prospect of following the United States by relocating its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem in a policy shift that critics described Tuesday as a desperate grab for domestic political gain to win a crucial by-election.

Opinion

October 16, 2018

Beijing’s Nuclear Option

By Caitlin Talmadge | Foreign Affairs

A war between the U.S. and China remains unlikely, but the prospect of a military confrontation—resulting, for example, from a Chinese campaign against Taiwan—no longer seems as implausible as it once did. And the odds of such a confrontation going nuclear are higher than most policymakers and analysts think.

News

October 15, 2018

Chinese Premier Pledges Access for Dutch Companies

By Mike Corder | Associated Press

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang reaffirmed pledges Monday to open up his country to foreign investment as a way of promoting commerce between his country and the Netherlands.

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