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News

March 24, 2017

Tillerson to Meet NATO on March 31, Ending No-Show Furor

By Robin Emmott & Lesley Wroughton | Reuters

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will meet NATO foreign ministers at a rescheduled gathering on March 31, a senior State Department official said on Friday, ending a furor over his earlier decision to skip the event.

Trump Administration Orders Tougher Screening of Visa Applicants

By Michael D. Shear | The New York Times

The Trump administration is making it tougher for millions of visitors to enter the United States by demanding new security checks before giving visas to tourists, business travelers and relatives of American residents.

U.S. President Donald Trump will announce the approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline at the White House on Friday, alongside the chief executive officer of builder TransCanada Corp, according to a senior administration official.

They are the ubiquitous face of the United Nations system: blue-helmeted peacekeepers scattered around the world’s war zones. But with the Trump administration threatening to cut funds for the United Nations and rethink the very utility of peacekeeping, the blue helmets are facing a significant overhaul that could affect the lives of civilians and, ultimately, the organization’s reputation.

More from WPR: Will Trump Choose Revolution or Reform for Dealing With the U.N.?

Opinion

March 24, 2017

A More Dangerous Globalism

By Jeremy Adelman & Anne-Laure Delatte | Project Syndicate

Today's most important political struggle is not between globalists and anti-globalists, but rather between two models of integration: one is multilateral and internationalist; the other is bilateral and imperialist. Throughout the modern age, the world has seesawed between them.

The Americas

News

March 24, 2017

Opinion

March 24, 2017

How Venezuela Can Avoid Suspension From the O.A.S.

By Luis Almagro | The New York Times

If Mr. Maduro’s government wants to avoid the potential dire consequences of a suspension, it must make a true commitment to democracy and take clear steps toward re-establishing it.

News

March 23, 2017

Europe

News

March 24, 2017

Opinion

March 24, 2017

A Turkish Thorn in the EU’s Side

By Javier Solana | Project Syndicate

While the European Union tries to weather a nationalist storm that threatens its core institutions, some of its most important strategic allies have injected more uncertainty into the current political climate. A clear example is Turkey, which has been a NATO member state since 1952, and an official candidate to join the EU since 1999.

Can Europe Be Saved?

The Economist

If it is to survive, the European Union must become a lot more flexible.

News

March 23, 2017

Africa

News

March 24, 2017

Gambia to Set Up Truth Commission and Offer Reparations

By John Abdoulie | Associated Press

Gambia will set up a truth and reconciliation commission to look into crimes committed by the former regime, and it will offer to pay reparations to victims, Justice Minister Abubacarr Tambedou announced Thursday night.

Africa faces the world's largest humanitarian crisis since 1945, with more than 20 million people facing starvation, and any cut in funding to humanitarian agencies working in famine-affected areas will cause untold suffering, a spokesman for the World Food Program said Thursday, responding to questions about U.S. President Donald Trump's proposal to cut $10 billion in foreign aid.

More from WPR: What Does the Populist Wave Mean for Global Aid and Development?

March 23, 2017

Middle East & North Africa

News

March 24, 2017

U.S. Investigating Mosul Strikes Said to Have Killed Up to 200 Civilians

By Time Arango & Helene Cooper | The New York Times

The American-led military coalition in Iraq said Friday that it was investigating reports that scores of civilians — perhaps as many as 200, according to local residents — had been killed in recent American airstrikes in Mosul, the northern Iraqi city where Iraq’s security forces have been waging a monthslong offensive.

The U.N. Syria envoy has kicked off the formal start of the fifth round of peace talks over 14 months between envoys from President Bashar Assad's government and opposition groups, amid slim hopes for an immediate breakthrough.

Hosni Mubarak Is Freed, to Dismay of Many in Egypt

By Declan Walsh | The New York Times

Six years after baying crowds ousted him at the peak of the Arab Spring, former President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt was freed on Friday from the Cairo hospital where he had been detained, capping a long and largely fruitless effort to hold him accountable for human rights abuses and endemic corruption during his three decades of rule.

Opinion

March 24, 2017

A Last Chance for Turkish Democracy

By Dexter Filkins | The New Yorker

Polls show that the referendum has the support of only around fifty per cent of likely Turkish voters. A “no” vote would be a crushing rebuke to the Turkish President, and, in the short-term, could provoke a violent reaction from him. But, if the Turkish people are serious about stemming Erdogan’s drive to dictatorship, this may be their last chance.

Asia-Pacific

News

March 24, 2017

Opinion

March 24, 2017

News

March 23, 2017

For the fifth time in the two decades since this former British colony’s return to Chinese rule, Hong Kong’s next chief executive will be selected on Sunday by a committee stacked with supporters of the Chinese government rather than by a free election.

United States

News

March 24, 2017

U.S. Investigating Mosul Strikes Said to Have Killed Up to 200 Civilians

By Time Arango & Helene Cooper | The New York Times

The American-led military coalition in Iraq said Friday that it was investigating reports that scores of civilians — perhaps as many as 200, according to local residents — had been killed in recent American airstrikes in Mosul, the northern Iraqi city where Iraq’s security forces have been waging a monthslong offensive.

Tillerson to Meet NATO on March 31, Ending No-Show Furor

By Robin Emmott & Lesley Wroughton | Reuters

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will meet NATO foreign ministers at a rescheduled gathering on March 31, a senior State Department official said on Friday, ending a furor over his earlier decision to skip the event.

Trump Administration Orders Tougher Screening of Visa Applicants

By Michael D. Shear | The New York Times

The Trump administration is making it tougher for millions of visitors to enter the United States by demanding new security checks before giving visas to tourists, business travelers and relatives of American residents.

U.S. President Donald Trump will announce the approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline at the White House on Friday, alongside the chief executive officer of builder TransCanada Corp, according to a senior administration official.

They are the ubiquitous face of the United Nations system: blue-helmeted peacekeepers scattered around the world’s war zones. But with the Trump administration threatening to cut funds for the United Nations and rethink the very utility of peacekeeping, the blue helmets are facing a significant overhaul that could affect the lives of civilians and, ultimately, the organization’s reputation.

More from WPR: Will Trump Choose Revolution or Reform for Dealing With the U.N.?

Opinion

March 24, 2017

A More Dangerous Globalism

By Jeremy Adelman & Anne-Laure Delatte | Project Syndicate

Today's most important political struggle is not between globalists and anti-globalists, but rather between two models of integration: one is multilateral and internationalist; the other is bilateral and imperialist. Throughout the modern age, the world has seesawed between them.

News

March 23, 2017

Opinion

March 23, 2017

Nationalists and Globalists

By Anne-Marie Slaughter | Project Syndicate

Populism means a politics of the people, juxtaposed against a politics of the elites. But, at least in the U.S., President Donald Trump’s ideology – which has little to do with traditional Republican conservatism – frames the axis of division not as the many versus the few, but as nationalists versus globalists.

The Americas

News

March 24, 2017

U.S. President Donald Trump will announce the approval of the Keystone XL oil pipeline at the White House on Friday, alongside the chief executive officer of builder TransCanada Corp, according to a senior administration official.

Opinion

March 24, 2017

How Venezuela Can Avoid Suspension From the O.A.S.

By Luis Almagro | The New York Times

If Mr. Maduro’s government wants to avoid the potential dire consequences of a suspension, it must make a true commitment to democracy and take clear steps toward re-establishing it.

News

March 23, 2017

A spokesman for China's commerce ministry confirmed Thursday his government has banned imports of Brazilian beef. Brazil's agriculture minister said earlier China suspended imports after investigators accused Brazilian inspectors of taking bribes to overlook expired meat and chemicals.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

News

March 22, 2017

New Prime Minister Urges Haitians to Heal Deep Divisions

By David McFadden | Associated Press

Haiti's new prime minister on Tuesday urged this deeply polarized country to bridge divisions, and he vowed to bring steady advances even while acknowledging that the struggling nation has no shortage of accelerating problems.

Europe

News

March 24, 2017

Tillerson to Meet NATO on March 31, Ending No-Show Furor

By Robin Emmott & Lesley Wroughton | Reuters

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson will meet NATO foreign ministers at a rescheduled gathering on March 31, a senior State Department official said on Friday, ending a furor over his earlier decision to skip the event.

Hurt by Britain's planned exit, European Union leaders are making a pilgrimage to Rome this weekend with the hope that a visit to the cradle of their project of unity can somehow rekindle the vigor of youth.

Opinion

March 24, 2017

A More Dangerous Globalism

By Jeremy Adelman & Anne-Laure Delatte | Project Syndicate

Today's most important political struggle is not between globalists and anti-globalists, but rather between two models of integration: one is multilateral and internationalist; the other is bilateral and imperialist. Throughout the modern age, the world has seesawed between them.

A Turkish Thorn in the EU’s Side

By Javier Solana | Project Syndicate

While the European Union tries to weather a nationalist storm that threatens its core institutions, some of its most important strategic allies have injected more uncertainty into the current political climate. A clear example is Turkey, which has been a NATO member state since 1952, and an official candidate to join the EU since 1999.

Can Europe Be Saved?

The Economist

If it is to survive, the European Union must become a lot more flexible.

News

March 23, 2017

The former Russian MP Denis Voronenkov has been shot and killed in Kiev. Police said an unidentified gunman had shot Voronenkov dead at the entrance of an upmarket hotel in the Ukrainian capital.

As the tricolor-draped coffin of former IRA commander turned peacemaker Martin McGuinness was carried to his Londonderry home this week, people across Northern Ireland's sectarian divide were nervously eyeing a new era of uncertainty.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

Nationalists and Globalists

By Anne-Marie Slaughter | Project Syndicate

Populism means a politics of the people, juxtaposed against a politics of the elites. But, at least in the U.S., President Donald Trump’s ideology – which has little to do with traditional Republican conservatism – frames the axis of division not as the many versus the few, but as nationalists versus globalists.

A Franco-German Bargain to Save Europe

By Philip Stephens | Financial Times (subscription required)

A restored relationship between Berlin and Paris would be an important source of confidence. It might also mark the beginning of a new “core Europe” with the will and capacity to deepen cooperation. Hard as it is to be optimistic about Europe, it is time to temper some of the pessimism.

EU Deeply Divided Over Western Sahara Policy

By Charlotte Bruneau | Al-Monitor

A European Court of Justice decision excluding Western Saharan exports from receiving preferential tariffs granted to Morocco has highlighted the need for the European Union to address the issue of who represents the people of Western Sahara.

Africa

News

March 24, 2017

Gambia to Set Up Truth Commission and Offer Reparations

By John Abdoulie | Associated Press

Gambia will set up a truth and reconciliation commission to look into crimes committed by the former regime, and it will offer to pay reparations to victims, Justice Minister Abubacarr Tambedou announced Thursday night.

Africa faces the world's largest humanitarian crisis since 1945, with more than 20 million people facing starvation, and any cut in funding to humanitarian agencies working in famine-affected areas will cause untold suffering, a spokesman for the World Food Program said Thursday, responding to questions about U.S. President Donald Trump's proposal to cut $10 billion in foreign aid.

More from WPR: What Does the Populist Wave Mean for Global Aid and Development?

March 23, 2017

Uganda is at a "breaking point" as almost 3,000 South Sudanese refugees pour into the country every day, the United Nations refugee chief said Thursday. The U.N. has called it the world's fastest-growing refugee crisis.

A former warlord and ex-vice-president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo has been sentenced by the International Criminal Court (ICC) to a year in jail and fined $320,000 for bribing witnesses during an earlier war crimes trial. Wednesday’s verdict and sentence are the first of their kind in the history of the ICC.

More from WPR: The ICC Is Flawed. Is It Still Africa’s Best Hope for Justice?

Tanzanian President John Magufuli yesterday witnessed the signing of three agreements between the governments of Tanzania and China to support the expansion of a police training institute in Kilimanjaro and the construction of a building for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and East African Cooperation.

Tunisian PM in Khartoum for Talks With Sudan Officials

By Mohammad al-Khatam | Anadolu Agency

Tunisian Prime Minister Yusuf al-Shahid arrived in Sudanese capital Khartoum on Wednesday for a two-day official visit. His visit is the first trip to Sudan by a Tunisian prime minister since former Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali was toppled in 2011’s “Arab Spring” uprisings.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

News

March 22, 2017

African Governments Urged to Spend More on Clean Water

By Rodney Muhumuza | Associated Press

Nearly a third of people in sub-Saharan Africa do not have access to safe drinking water, the World Water Council said Wednesday, urging governments to contribute adequate amounts of their budgets toward projects aimed at making safe water widely available.

UNHCR, the U.N. Refugee Agency, is concerned by continuing forced return of hundreds of refugees from Cameroon’s far north region to north-eastern Nigeria despite the recent signing of the tripartite agreement aimed at, among other things, ensuring the voluntary nature of returns.

Middle East & North Africa

News

March 24, 2017

U.S. Investigating Mosul Strikes Said to Have Killed Up to 200 Civilians

By Time Arango & Helene Cooper | The New York Times

The American-led military coalition in Iraq said Friday that it was investigating reports that scores of civilians — perhaps as many as 200, according to local residents — had been killed in recent American airstrikes in Mosul, the northern Iraqi city where Iraq’s security forces have been waging a monthslong offensive.

The U.N. Syria envoy has kicked off the formal start of the fifth round of peace talks over 14 months between envoys from President Bashar Assad's government and opposition groups, amid slim hopes for an immediate breakthrough.

Hosni Mubarak Is Freed, to Dismay of Many in Egypt

By Declan Walsh | The New York Times

Six years after baying crowds ousted him at the peak of the Arab Spring, former President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt was freed on Friday from the Cairo hospital where he had been detained, capping a long and largely fruitless effort to hold him accountable for human rights abuses and endemic corruption during his three decades of rule.

Moroccan King Mohammed VI has received in Rabat King Abdullah II of Jordan, with whom he held talks on bilateral ties and developments in the Arab region.

Opinion

March 24, 2017

A Turkish Thorn in the EU’s Side

By Javier Solana | Project Syndicate

While the European Union tries to weather a nationalist storm that threatens its core institutions, some of its most important strategic allies have injected more uncertainty into the current political climate. A clear example is Turkey, which has been a NATO member state since 1952, and an official candidate to join the EU since 1999.

A Last Chance for Turkish Democracy

By Dexter Filkins | The New Yorker

Polls show that the referendum has the support of only around fifty per cent of likely Turkish voters. A “no” vote would be a crushing rebuke to the Turkish President, and, in the short-term, could provoke a violent reaction from him. But, if the Turkish people are serious about stemming Erdogan’s drive to dictatorship, this may be their last chance.

News

March 23, 2017

Jihadists and other rebel groups made advances against the Syrian army north of Hama on Thursday, a war monitor said, part of their biggest offensive for months, underscoring the bleak prospects for peace talks which resume later in the day.

Tunisian PM in Khartoum for Talks With Sudan Officials

By Mohammad al-Khatam | Anadolu Agency

Tunisian Prime Minister Yusuf al-Shahid arrived in Sudanese capital Khartoum on Wednesday for a two-day official visit. His visit is the first trip to Sudan by a Tunisian prime minister since former Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali was toppled in 2011’s “Arab Spring” uprisings.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

EU Deeply Divided Over Western Sahara Policy

By Charlotte Bruneau | Al-Monitor

A European Court of Justice decision excluding Western Saharan exports from receiving preferential tariffs granted to Morocco has highlighted the need for the European Union to address the issue of who represents the people of Western Sahara.

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees

By Max Abrahms, Denis Sullivan, & Charles Simpson | Foreign Affairs

The Syrian refugee crisis is the worst human security disaster of the twenty-first century. Yet a lack of direct evidence from the field has spawned speculation, misinformation, and poorly informed policymaking.

Asia-Pacific

News

March 24, 2017

Indonesia's counterterrorism squad has arrested four suspected Islamic militants who were trying to establish a jihadist training camp in eastern Indonesia and who likely had links with Abu Sayyaf militants in the southern Philippines, police said Friday.

Opinion

March 24, 2017

News

March 23, 2017

For the fifth time in the two decades since this former British colony’s return to Chinese rule, Hong Kong’s next chief executive will be selected on Sunday by a committee stacked with supporters of the Chinese government rather than by a free election.

Taliban Forces Seize Strategic District in Embattled Helmand Province

By Pamela Constable & Sayed Salahuddin | The Washington Post

Taliban insurgents captured a strategic district in embattled Helmand Province Thursday, officials said, while Afghan troops were evacuated from the area and Air Force planes bombed military installations there to prevent the Taliban from using them.

Pakistan held a military parade on Thursday to mark its national day, with Chinese, Saudi and Turkish troops for the first time participating in the event in a show of deepening ties with the world's only declared Islamic nuclear power. Earlier, President Mamnoon Hussain told the audience that his country was ready for talks with India on all issues, including the disputed Kashmir.

More from WPR: What Will It Take To Get Troubled India-Pakistan Ties Back on Track?

Vietnam and Singapore have signed several business agreements as the island state seeks to boost investment and trade with the communist country during a visit by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.

A spokesman for China's commerce ministry confirmed Thursday his government has banned imports of Brazilian beef. Brazil's agriculture minister said earlier China suspended imports after investigators accused Brazilian inspectors of taking bribes to overlook expired meat and chemicals.

Tanzanian President John Magufuli yesterday witnessed the signing of three agreements between the governments of Tanzania and China to support the expansion of a police training institute in Kilimanjaro and the construction of a building for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and East African Cooperation.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

News

March 22, 2017

China is not building an environmental monitoring station on a disputed South China Sea shoal, the foreign ministry said Wednesday, apparently denying remarks made by a local official last week.

India Tries to Fix Iran Trade Payments as Trump Hardens Line

By Nidhi Verma & Manoj Kumar | Reuters

India is exploring setting up a new payments mechanism for trade with Iran, after its old sanctions workaround broke down, as state banks remain fearful of handling payments from Tehran in case the United States imposes a fresh financial embargo.

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