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News

February 24, 2017

Mexico Rejected U.S. Plan on Third-Country Deportees

By Christopher Sherman | Associated Press

The Mexican government made clear to visiting U.S. emissaries that it will not accept deportees from third countries under any circumstances, the interior secretary said Friday.

Trump Vows Military Build-Up, Hammers Nationalist Themes

By Emily Stephenson & Steve Holland | Reuters

President Donald Trump said he would make a massive budget request for one of the "greatest military buildups in American history" on Friday in a feisty, campaign-style speech extolling robust nationalism to eager conservative activists.

U.S. Changes Rules of Engagement for Mosul Fight in Iraq

By Susannah George & Balint Szlanko | Associated Press

U.S. Army Lt. Col. James Browning juggled phone calls on an overstuffed sofa in a small village south of Mosul. His counterparts in the Iraqi army's 9th Division were pushing toward western Mosul, just a few miles away and were coming under mortar fire from the Islamic State group as they moved on a power station.

More from WPR: Will the Battle for Mosul Validate Obama’s Counter-Extremism Strategy?

Bannon Vows a Daily Fight for ‘Deconstruction of the Administrative State’

By Philip Rucker & Robert Costa | The Washington Post

The reclusive mastermind behind President Trump’s nationalist ideology and combative tactics made his public debut Thursday, delivering a fiery rebuke of the media and declaring that the new administration is in an unending battle for “deconstruction of the administrative state.”

Peru's President Set to Talk Tough to Trump During U.S. Visit

By Franklin Briceno & Joshua Goodman | Associated Press

When Peruvian President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski becomes the first Latin American leader to visit Donald Trump at the White House on Friday it will be a chance for the U.S. president to hear some straight talk about how his anti-trade and anti-immigrant rhetoric is alienating some of America's closest allies.

More from WPR: With a Strong Economy and New President, Is Peru Ready to Modernize?

Opinion

February 24, 2017

Trump, Putin, and the New Cold War

By Evan Osnos, David Remnick, and Joshua Yaffa | The New Yorker

What lay behind Russia’s interference in the 2016 election—and what lies ahead?

Can Mexico Block Trump’s New Deportation Rules?

By Adam Chandler | The Atlantic

The administration’s plan to force undocumented immigrants out of the U.S. largely hinges on America’s increasingly tense relationship with its southern neighbor.

The Americas

News

February 24, 2017

Mexico Rejected U.S. Plan on Third-Country Deportees

By Christopher Sherman | Associated Press

The Mexican government made clear to visiting U.S. emissaries that it will not accept deportees from third countries under any circumstances, the interior secretary said Friday.

Peru's President Set to Talk Tough to Trump During U.S. Visit

By Franklin Briceno & Joshua Goodman | Associated Press

When Peruvian President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski becomes the first Latin American leader to visit Donald Trump at the White House on Friday it will be a chance for the U.S. president to hear some straight talk about how his anti-trade and anti-immigrant rhetoric is alienating some of America's closest allies.

More from WPR: With a Strong Economy and New President, Is Peru Ready to Modernize?

Opinion

February 24, 2017

Can Mexico Block Trump’s New Deportation Rules?

By Adam Chandler | The Atlantic

The administration’s plan to force undocumented immigrants out of the U.S. largely hinges on America’s increasingly tense relationship with its southern neighbor.

Europe

News

February 24, 2017

Estonia has marked its 99th anniversary of its declaration of independence with more than 1,000 troops from eight NATO nations parading and presenting military hardware on Friday, including two U.S. Abrams tanks that were displayed to the public for the first time.

Opinion

February 24, 2017

Trump, Putin, and the New Cold War

By Evan Osnos, David Remnick, and Joshua Yaffa | The New Yorker

What lay behind Russia’s interference in the 2016 election—and what lies ahead?

Africa

News

February 24, 2017

South Africa Anti-Immigrant Protests Erupt in Capital

By Nqobile Ntshangase | Associated Press

Police fired stun grenades, rubber bullets and water cannon Friday as the latest wave of anti-immigrant protests broke out in South Africa's capital, while President Jacob Zuma condemned anti-foreigner violence and appealed for calm.

The Nigerian president's month-long medical leave overseas has empowered his deputy to attack the country's problems with an energy that has surprised observers and led some to suggest he should stay in charge for good.

Ethiopia and South Sudan signed nine cooperation agreements on Friday as part of an ongoing visit by South Sudanese President Salva Kiir, who arrived in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa on Thursday. 

Middle East & North Africa

News

February 24, 2017

U.S. Changes Rules of Engagement for Mosul Fight in Iraq

By Susannah George & Balint Szlanko | Associated Press

U.S. Army Lt. Col. James Browning juggled phone calls on an overstuffed sofa in a small village south of Mosul. His counterparts in the Iraqi army's 9th Division were pushing toward western Mosul, just a few miles away and were coming under mortar fire from the Islamic State group as they moved on a power station.

More from WPR: Will the Battle for Mosul Validate Obama’s Counter-Extremism Strategy?

Islamic State Car Bomb Kills Dozens in Northwest Syria

By Angus McDowall & Humeyra Pamuk | Reuters

An Islamic State car bomb killed more than 40 people on Friday in a Syrian village held by rebels, a war monitor said, a day after the jihadist group was driven from its last stronghold in the area.

Egypt Christians Flee Sinai After a Spate of Attacks

By Ashraf Sweliam & Maggie Michael | Associated Press

Suspected Islamic militants gunned down a Coptic Christian man and stabbed his daughter to death inside his home in northern Sinai, the seventh such killing in a month's time in the restive region, officials and a Christian priest said Friday, prompting hundreds of Christians to flee from the area for fear of being targeted next.

More from WPR: Like Previous Egyptian Leaders, El-Sissi Has Failed to Protect Coptic Christians

Indonesia is hoping to ring up investment deals worth billions of dollars when Saudi Arabia's King Salman and an entourage of 1,500 officials, princes and businessmen visit the Indonesian capital next week.

Opinion

February 24, 2017

The Politics of Historicide

By Richard N. Haass | Project Syndicate

The Islamic State has made a point of destroying cultural artifacts that it deems insufficiently Islamic, but it is hardly the first group or state to take aim at the past. In fact, the eradication of statutes, manuscripts, and paintings occurs with a frequency that is as understandable as the practice is perverse.

Asia-Pacific

News

February 24, 2017

For decades, North Korea could count on China as a loyal ally despite the erratic behavior of the ruling Kim dynasty. But by this week, things may have gone too far, with North Korea unleashing a tirade in which it deployed some of the most damning insults in its playbook, accusing China of “dancing to the tune of the U.S.” and “styling itself as a big power.”

China's government has named a trade specialist as its new commerce minister and appointed a new head of its top economic planning body as part of a Cabinet reshuffle that comes amid a slowing economy and the threat of increased trade friction with President Donald Trump's administration.

Pakistan Army Launches First Nationwide Anti-Terrorism Operation

By Pamela Constable | The Washington Post

When the Pakistan army announced that it was launching a nationwide military operation to “indiscriminately” eliminate the threat of terrorism from the land, the adverb had a precise and politically loaded meaning.

Indonesia is hoping to ring up investment deals worth billions of dollars when Saudi Arabia's King Salman and an entourage of 1,500 officials, princes and businessmen visit the Indonesian capital next week.

Rare scandal was swirling around Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Friday as he was forced to deny involvement in a shady land deal by a religious school. That led Abe on Friday to pledge he would resign if any wrongdoing was uncovered.

Opinion

February 24, 2017

Militant Groups Forge Ties as Pakistan Havens Remain

By Ahmed Rashid | Financial Times (subscription required)

Pakistan's army and the civilian government are not on the same page. They have different agendas towards the militant groups which makes establishing a united front difficult. The failure of the state to adopt a common strategy and a believable narrative is emboldening the terrorists, weakening the state and making solutions harder to find.

Insurgency and Repression in Myanmar

By Lynn Kuok | Foreign Affairs (subscription required)

Since October 9, 2016, 66,000 Rohingya, members of a Muslim minority in Buddhist-majority Myanmar, have fled Rakhine State in the country’s west and entered neighboring Bangladesh. Today, they are not fleeing Rakhine Buddhists, with whom they first clashed in May 2012. They are fleeing their own government.

North Korea’s Palace Intrigue

By Jean H. Lee | The New York Times

Last week, Mr. Kim’s estranged older half brother, Kim Jong-nam, died in Malaysia, the apparent victim of a nerve-agent attack in the Kuala Lumpur airport. The Malaysian police named several suspects, including a North Korean diplomat. Many South Koreans, without needing proof, are calling it a political assassination directed by Kim Jong-un. North Korea denies that.

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