A protestor at COP27 2022 in support of a "loss and damage" fund to mitigate the effects of climate change

The U.N. COP27 Climate Change Conference wrapped up this month with a historic breakthrough, as world leaders agreed to create a dedicated fund to address “loss and damage” stemming from the impacts of climate change in developing countries. Now that’s been agreed to, though, the real work of financing it begins.

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Last week, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador canceled a Pacific Alliance summit scheduled to be held in Mexico this month, after Peru’s Congress prevented President Pedro Castillo from traveling abroad. The incident highlights a challenge for the group, which is floundering for a purpose and facing internal tensions.

A woman protests in Iran after the death of Mahsa Amini

The initial inability of many in the West to fully grasp the scale of what is now unfolding in Iran is the product of three dynamics that reflect deeper problems with how the EU and U.S. engage with the wider world. To avoid repeating those mistakes, the West needs to mitigate such distortions of perceptions and policy.

A vigil after a mass shooting in Colorado at an LGBTQ nightclub

A recent mass shooting at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado has elevated conversations about the risks and rights abuses experienced by queer people and those with nonconforming gender identities in U.S. society and worldwide. But it also underscores the connections between gender extremism and violence more broadly.

Argentina's President, amid a crisis in its economy and rapid inflation, made a deal with China

On the sidelines of last week’s G-20 leaders’ summit, Argentina and China struck a deal to increase their currency swap program. By doing so, however, China is playing to the worst economic instincts of Argentina’s Peronist government, for which every economic problem can be solved by simply throwing yet another currency plan at it.

Donald Trump announcing a bid to be GOP nominee for president in 2024 with an anti-immigration messaging

Whether or not Donald Trump is on the way out as the leader of the Republican Party remains to be seen. But the policy views he espoused first as a candidate in 2016 and then as president from 2017 to 2021 are not. This will be especially evident when it comes to the cornerstone of “Trumpism”: opposition to immigration.

In Sri Lanka, a protest over the economy and debt crisis created by the Rajapaksa brothers

As Sri Lanka tries to regain its footing after its economic collapse this year, legislators have introduced changes to the constitution, limiting the power of what was a dominant presidency. The question is whether Sri Lanka will be able to implement more wide-ranging reforms needed to prevent another disaster in the future.

A Russian naval ship on the Black Sea amid a conflict in Ukraine

The strategic and economic importance of the Black Sea region has made it the center of conflict for centuries, and several factors make it unlikely that it will suddenly find stability when the war in Ukraine ends. As a result, the EU and U.S. should be developing contingency plans to ensure stability in the Black Sea region now.

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The energy crisis triggered by the war in Ukraine has the potential to accelerate a historical transition from fossil fuels to a more sustainable and secure energy system. But to come close to keeping the planet from warming no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, a decisive phaseout of fossil fuels is required.

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Even a narrow GOP majority in a single congressional chamber could stymie President Joe Biden’s domestic agenda. From a foreign policy perspective, however, divided government does not necessarily hold presidents back. Unsurprisingly, the Biden administration portrayed the results of the midterms as a victory for his foreign policy.

Biden on the campaign trail trying to prevent a Republican-majority congress

The midterm congressional elections, like most in the U.S., came down to the domestic issues that voters care most about, namely their pocketbooks. But while the domestic impact of the elections will be most immediate, the midterms nevertheless do matter for U.S. foreign policy and global affairs more generally.

Jair Bolsonaro actually accepting defeat after Brazil's elections

Ahead of Brazil’s presidential election, many observers warned that Jair Bolsonaro was following Donald Trump’s playbook from 2020, sowing the seeds of doubt in the election process in order to claim it was rigged afterward. But instead, he accepted the loss. So were red-flag alarmists wrong to argue that Brazilian democracy was in danger?

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For decades, British commentators have expressed concern over other societies that have faced death spirals of governance. Now it is beginning to dawn on many senior political figures in the U.K. that their own system may be drifting dangerously close to the kind of existential crisis they used to think could only happen elsewhere.

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Since the onset of the war in Ukraine, hundreds of thousands of Russian men have fled the country to avoid being pressed into military service. In response, several European nations have barred Russian asylum-seekers from entering the country. But arguments for barring Russian draft-dodgers don’t stand up to scrutiny.

people in latin america use twitter during a protest

In South America, Twitter has become an online extension of real-life political battlefields, and likely will remain so given economic forecasts for the coming year. That raises big questions over how Elon Musk’s ownership of the platform will affect how protests are organized, how governments respond and how disinformation spreads.

The US Dollar, as a reserve currency

The struggling global economy has led some to wonder if the U.S. dollar may lose its status as the world’s “reserve currency,” meaning its position as the currency most widely held by foreign governments. But for several reasons, we are more likely to see so-called dollar hegemony continue for some time into the future.

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Political polarization is not exactly new in Latin America, but it has sharply intensified. The next possible flashpoint is Bolivia, where political, economic, ethnic and regional divisions have exploded in the past and threaten to do so again, over an arcane but combustible issue: When should the country hold its national census?

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