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A Tunisian woman shows her ink-stained finger after voting at a polling station in Ben Arous, Tunisia, Oct. 26, 2014 (AP photo by Aimen Zine).
World Citizen

In Tunisia, Arab Spring Can Be Written Without Quotation Marks

By Frida Ghitis
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Years have now passed since one could use the term “Arab Spring” without deliberate irony, or at least quotation marks. And yet there is one country where the hopes of the once-euphoric revolutionaries did not turn out to have been misplaced. Yes, the Arab Spring has bloomed in Tunisia. more


Diplomatic Fallout

Frustrations Mount for Both the U.S. and Its Foes at the U.N.

By Richard Gowan
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Criticisms by Vladimir Putin and Samantha Power of the international system last week are illustrations of a well-established paradox: While many countries believe the U.S. wields too much influence, American policymakers are repeatedly frustrated by the system’s failure to deliver in major crises. more

Strategic Horizons

Updated Weinberger Principles Still a Guide for Use of U.S. Force

By Steven Metz
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In 1984, at the height of the post-Vietnam malaise, then-Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger suggested a set of principles to guide the use of the American military. Since then, the principles fell by the wayside, resulting in renewed malaise. It might be time to dust off the Weinberger principles. more

Strategic Horizons

The U.S. Army Makes Its Case for Post-COIN Relevance

By Steven Metz
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Since the end of the Iraq and Afghanistan counterinsurgencies, the U.S. Army has struggled to reinvent itself and preserve its force structure. This week it released a new roadmap intended to explain its value in the tumultuous and complex security environment that the U.S. faces. more