All Columns

U.S. door gunners in H-21 Shawnee gunships look for a suspected Viet Cong guerrilla who ran to a foxhole from the sampan on the Mekong Delta river bank, Jan. 17, 1964 (AP photo by Horst Faas).
Strategic Horizons

For Hint of Iraq’s Future, Take Another Look at Vietnam War

By Steven Metz
, , Column

Although it was common to hear ominous warnings of “another Vietnam” as Iraq devolved into insurgency in 2004, many soon concluded that the Vietnam analogy did not apply to Iraq. But Iraq’s unraveling over the past year suggests the Vietnam conflict may provide indications of Iraq’s future after all. more


World Citizen

BRICS Still Have a Long Way to Go From Grouping to Alliance

By Frida Ghitis
, , Column

Ever since the BRICS grouping was coined in 2001, its members have been trying to transform their snappy acronym into a global player. And nobody has promoted that ambition more enthusiastically than Vladimir Putin. The problem is that not all BRICS members share his antipathy toward the West. more

Diplomatic Fallout

Can Putin Rebrand Russia as Stabilizing Force in Ukraine, Syria?

By Richard Gowan
, , Column

Vladimir Putin looked a little isolated on May 9, when world leaders largely stayed away from Moscow’s parade commemorating the end of World War II. But since then, Angela Merkel has gone to Moscow for talks, and John Kerry has visited Putin in Sochi. Putin may not be globally popular, but he is no pariah. more

Strategic Horizons

Robotic Revolution Opens New Front for Homeland Security

By Steven Metz
, , Column

The growing interest in robots among the world’s militaries has potential dangers, among them that autonomous “killer robots” might someday be used against humans. While this certainly deserves concern and attention, there is an even greater risk: the adoption of robots by “dark organizations.” more

World Citizen

Camp David Summit Is U.S. Debut for Rising Saudi Prince

By Frida Ghitis
, , Column

Among the many challenges facing President Barack Obama and U.S. officials meeting with Gulf Arab leaders this week, one has abruptly climbed to near the top of the agenda: taking the measure of the rising star of the Saudi firmament, King Salman’s son Prince Mohammed bin Salman. more

Global Insights

As Russia-China Alignment Grows, Shared Vulnerabilities Emerge

By Richard Weitz
, , Column

One noteworthy aspect of last week’s Victory Day celebrations in Moscow was the emphasis Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping placed on their countries’ historical and other ties. Yet the two leaders’ growing alignment highlights shared vulnerabilities and inefficiencies common to authoritarian regimes. more

Diplomatic Fallout

Marginalized U.N. Fights for Humanitarian Agenda in Middle East

By Richard Gowan
, , Column

Last week, the United Nations was thrust back into the center of crisis management in the Arab world. But while a new round of Syria talks and calls for greater involvement in Libya and Yemen imply the U.N. is still a central player in Middle East crises, the reality may turn out to prove the reverse. more

Strategic Horizons

Will the U.S. Military Continue to Win the Innovation Contest?

By Steven Metz
, , Column

Strategic superiority is not simply a matter of who has the most troops and weapons. It is also about who wins the ongoing contest of military innovation to possess tomorrow’s winning ideas. A few decades ago the U.S. was the undisputed master of this contest. Today, the playing field has leveled. more