An oil and gas platform operates off the coast of Libya.

European governments are seeking to deepen their oil and gas partnerships with Libya, largely to diversify away from Russian supplies. Yet by neglecting internal challenges such as political discord, corruption and militias, they may jeopardize their own objectives as well as Libya’s path to stability and economic recovery.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy attends a U.N. Security Council meeting.

When the U.N. convenes Friday to mark the second anniversary of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the events may feel a little low-key. One reason is that many U.N. members want to focus on other issues. The second is that the West’s failure to support a cease-fire in the Israel-Hamas war has alienated a lot of non-Western representatives.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

As an aspirational great power, India had a big year for its foreign policy in 2023, marked by highlights that brought India’s potential as a political, economic and strategic player to the limelight. However, despite its proactive diplomatic engagements, India’s foreign policy continues to face enduring challenges.

Members of Senegal's opposition.

Senegalese President Macky Sall announced Friday that he would comply with a court order to conduct the country’s presidential election as soon as possible, after he attempted to delay the polls until December. The controversy is just the latest close call for Senegal’s democracy, which has significantly eroded under Sall.

Jack Quaid and Zazie Beetz announce this year’s nominees for the Best International Feature Film category of the 96th Oscars.

The Best International Feature Film category at the Academy Awards is supposed to help Hollywood forge closer ties with foreign film industries. But flaws in the category’s rules and process have not only have made it highly politicized and often unfair, but have also prevented it from fulfilling its purpose.

Burundian President Evariste Ndayishimiye.

In January, Burundi severed diplomatic ties with Rwanda, accusing Kigali of supporting a DRC-based militia that attacked a Burundian town the month prior. Though sudden, the rift between Burundi and Rwanda just two years after their ostensible reconciliation is unsurprising and can be traced to the conflict in eastern Congo.

Japanese Prime Minister Kishida Fumio meets with South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol.

In August 2023, Japan, South Korea and the U.S. signed a set of documents intended to deepen and institutionalize trilateral cooperation. But whether these agreements can endure will depend on domestic politics in Japan and especially South Korea, and not least of all whether their disputes over historical issues can be overcome.

A Filipino worker tears down a wall showing a mural painting of Bob Marley.

The release of the Bob Marley biopic, “One Love,” presents an opportunity to reexamine Marley’s broader intellectual legacy, which has important lessons for anyone interested in the politics of freedom movements and is of particular significance for observers and practitioners of international development.

Mohammed Hamdan Dagalo offers condolences to UAE President Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan.

Relations between Sudan and the United Arab Emirates have deteriorated rapidly in recent months because of Abu Dhabi’s alleged support for the Rapid Support Forces, which remains at war with the military-led government. Now, Sudan has reestablished ties with Iran, the latest signal that the UAE’s stance has backfired.

Local moto-taxi drivers transport migrants near the Darien Gap.

There is no silver bullet for solving the humanitarian challenge on display in the Darien Gap, which thousands of migrants pass through daily. But any solution must involve creating sustainable economic opportunities for residents of border towns, so they are not drawn into the lucrative business of human smuggling.

A traditional mass wedding held by the Houthis in Yemen.

Given that so many rebel groups seek to radically restructure society, it comes as no surprise that they would also concern themselves with regulating marriage. So while much of the coverage of rebel marriages is sensationalistic and shallow, marriage is a critical but underappreciated aspect of rebels’ wartime activities.

Congolese President Felix Tshisekedi.

Given the high stakes involved in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a wide range of domestic, regional and global actors had an interest in a peaceful outcome to December’s presidential election. This accounts for the collective sigh of relief following President Felix Tshisekedi’s landslide victory, despite widespread irregularities.

Malaysian Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim.

When Malaysian Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim took office, even his own supporters doubted that he could tackle much-needed reforms. But they expected to see at least some of the changes he had promised during his years in opposition. Slightly more than a year into Anwar’s term, however, he has scant progress to show on any front.

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez.

Last week’s defeat of a controversial amnesty measure underscores the difficulties facing Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez. Having deftly engineered an improbable return to office after last year’s elections, Sanchez now finds himself at the head of a coalition even more unruly than his previous complex, multiparty alliance.

A man changes his car's tire in Havana, Cuba.

Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel replaced the country’s economy minister, amid delays to planned price hikes for fuel and transportation that the government blamed on a cyberattack. The fate of the measures, which had been scheduled for Feb. 1, is now uncertain. But the economic crisis that made them necessary is exceedingly clear.

The port in Djibouti.

Djibouti has built its economic model around shipping services and maritime logistics, and among its most prominent partners is its landlocked neighbor, Ethiopia. To cater to Ethiopia’s needs, Djibouti has built a host of new infrastructure. Unsurprisingly, Ethiopia’s port deal with Somaliland has set off alarm bells in Djibouti.

Nigerian President Bola Tinubu.

When Nigerian President Bola Tinubu was elected chairperson of the ECOWAS last July, he underscored his commitment to defending democracy across the region, which had already seen a string of military coups. That could come back to haunt him, given recent developments in the region and ECOWAS’ performance under Tinubu’s leadership.