Gender equality in sports will be a major storyline at the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup.

FIFA has gone to great lengths to keep soccer and politics separate, and in the past has applied the same apolitical facade to both the men’s and women’s game. In recent years, though, and especially following the 2019 edition of the tournament, the Women’s World Cup has become an event in which politics is a part of its brand.

Then-German Chancellor Angela Merkel and then-Prime Minister of New Zealand Jacinda Ardern.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the question of whether women make better leaders in a crisis gained prominence. Now, the near-absence of women from the world stage has returned to being something of a “So what?” issue. But with the world continuing to face numerous crises, women’s political leadership is more, not less, important.

The pervasive issue of misogyny and sexism in online spaces has prompted increased scrutiny of social media platforms and their content moderation policies, as many advocate for stronger measures to address these harmful behaviors online.

While making the world safer for women and girls is the goal of the U.N. Commission on the Status of Women, it has historically focused on doing so in physical spaces. But as the emphasis on the digital age at this year’s annual CSW session made clear, its mission must expand to include harm and gendered violence that takes place online.

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