A Global Movement to Memorialize War’s Civilian Victims Gathers Steam

The “Broken Chair” monument to land mine victims at the Place des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, July 16, 2009 (AP photo by Anja Niedringhaus).
The “Broken Chair” monument to land mine victims at the Place des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, July 16, 2009 (AP photo by Anja Niedringhaus).
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While Americans commemorated their fallen soldiers on Memorial Day this week, a group of activists in Luxembourg were inaugurating a different kind of war memorial. Handicap International Belgium, that country’s chapter of an NGO originally dedicated to civilian victims of landmines, unveiled a sculpture by artist Manolis Manarakis commemorating the civilian dead of all modern wars. It was the latest in a series of monument unveilings, including another just last month in Brussels, meant not only to recognize civilian victims of war, but to underscore their absence in the global culture of war memorials. In the United States, Memorial Day […]

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