Without Chad, Central African Republic Peace Talks Unlikely to Succeed

Without Chad, Central African Republic Peace Talks Unlikely to Succeed
Members of Anti-balaka, a Christian militia, Bangui, Central African Republic, Feb. 26, 2014 (AP photo via Kyodo by Tomoaki Nakano).

All sides in Central African Republic’s civil war are looking to a peace conference this week in Brazzaville, the capital of the neighboring Republic of Congo, in the hopes that it could yield a cease-fire agreement. Congolese President Denis Sassou-Nguesso is presiding over the summit, which began yesterday and will run until July 23, under the auspices of the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS). However, there are already major questions about what the meeting can actually achieve. As of the opening of the summit, it was still unclear who would be representing the main rebel group, Seleka. What’s […]

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