With Tillerson Out, Qatar Has Lost an Ally in Washington. Should It Be Worried?

Recently fired Secretary of State Rex Tillerson with Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani before a meeting at the State Department, Washington, Nov. 20, 2017 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).
Recently fired Secretary of State Rex Tillerson with Qatari Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani before a meeting at the State Department, Washington, Nov. 20, 2017 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).

For the past nine months, the tiny but very wealthy Arab state of Qatar has been subjected to a blockade by its three immediate neighbors—Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain—as well as Egypt, which accuse it of supporting terrorism and aligning itself with their regional rival, Iran. But the blockade has hardly achieved its aim of isolating Qatar and forcing it to abandon its independent foreign policy. Instead, Qatar’s economy remains mostly unaffected and its external relations are largely intact. On Tuesday, however, Qatar lost an important partner when President Donald Trump abruptly sacked his secretary of state, […]

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