Will the U.N. General Assembly End Up Being Trump’s Perfect Enemy?

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley addresses the Security Council after a vote to sanction North Korea, New York, June 2, 2017 (AP photo by Bebeto Matthews).
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley addresses the Security Council after a vote to sanction North Korea, New York, June 2, 2017 (AP photo by Bebeto Matthews).
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Can the Trump administration give the General Assembly of the United Nations a new sense of purpose? This may sound like an uproariously silly question. The assembly, in which all U.N. member states are theoretically equals, is largely a geopolitical backwater. It churns out hundreds of resolutions each year, and the vast majority of these are unimportant. Few people are probably aware that the assembly passed a lengthy resolution on the political status of Bermuda last year, for example, and even fewer are likely to be excited that it did so. Yet the assembly can cause the occasional kerfuffle. Last […]

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