Why the New Nuclear Weapons Ban Treaty Is So Polarizing

Why the New Nuclear Weapons Ban Treaty Is So Polarizing
A retired Minuteman 1 ballistic missile at the entrance to Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota. In 1971, the Minuteman 1 was replaced by the Minuteman 3, which forms the foundation of the U.S. nuclear defense strategy (AP photo by Charlie Riedel).

Few noticed the negotiations at the United Nations for a legally binding prohibition on nuclear weapons, until they were quickly completed last month. On July 7, 122 states voted in favor of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, which prohibits parties from engaging in activities related to the development, deployment or use of nuclear weapons, and lays out pathways to eventually disarm those states that possess them. The ban is likely to reinforce existing divides between countries that rely on nuclear weapons for their security, and those that don’t—an outcome for which proponents and opponents of the treaty […]

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