Why the International Response in CAR Can’t Contain the Violence

French President Francois Hollande inspects arms confiscated from ex-Seleka rebels at a French military base in Bangui, Central African Republic, Feb. 28, 2014 (AP Photo/Sia kambou, Pool).
French President Francois Hollande inspects arms confiscated from ex-Seleka rebels at a French military base in Bangui, Central African Republic, Feb. 28, 2014 (AP Photo/Sia kambou, Pool).

Despite a cease-fire in July and a United Nations mission in September that raised hopes of restoring order, the crisis in the Central African Republic (CAR) flared up again last month. The conflict originated with the rise of the Seleka, a predominantly Muslim insurgency that launched in December 2012 and overthrew CAR’s President Francois Bozize in March 2013, a decade after Bozize took power in a military coup. After presiding over mass violence and internal displacement, Seleka leader Michel Djotodia was forced to resign from the presidency in January 2014 at a regional summit in Chad. But interim President Catherine […]

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