Why Israel’s Upcoming Election Is a Show About Nothing

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu opens the weekly Cabinet meeting at his office in Jerusalem, Jan. 6, 2019 (AP photo by Gali Tibbon).
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu opens the weekly Cabinet meeting at his office in Jerusalem, Jan. 6, 2019 (AP photo by Gali Tibbon).
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JERUSALEM—In three months, Israelis will head to the polls in what may become one of the most sensational yet least significant elections in their country’s recent memory. The race is already generating ample drama, with political parties forming and breaking up on what seems like an almost daily basis. But the always entertaining horse-race coverage belies a hopelessly stagnant political system, and a public discourse disinterested in policy and ideas. The contest will not be between different ideological approaches or policy solutions to Israel’s mounting problems, but between a few prominent figures who run political parties like private businesses and […]

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