Why Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood Needs to Transform to Survive

An Egyptian youth carries a lit flare as supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood protest in the El-Mataria neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt, April 24, 2015 (AP photo by Belal Darder).
An Egyptian youth carries a lit flare as supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood protest in the El-Mataria neighborhood of Cairo, Egypt, April 24, 2015 (AP photo by Belal Darder).
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Editor’s Note: WPR has agreed to publish this article anonymously due to the hostile environment in Egypt toward political dissent and independent reporting. Tracking down the Society of the Muslim Brothers, better known as the Muslim Brotherhood, is a difficult task. Ever since the group was outlawed in Egypt following the July 2013 military coup that brought Field Marshal Abdel Fattah el-Sisi to power, those Brotherhood members who have not been killed, executed or imprisoned have kept their heads down. Inside Egypt, they generally refuse to meet or cancel at the last minute for fear of being identified and apprehended […]

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