Why Carbon Taxes, Despite Their Effectiveness, Have Hit Roadblocks

A coal-fired power plant in Shuozhou, Shanxi, China. (Photo by Wikimedia user Kleineolive, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Agreement).
A coal-fired power plant in Shuozhou, Shanxi, China. (Photo by Wikimedia user Kleineolive, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported Agreement).
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Australia’s new senate is working to repeal the country’s unpopular carbon tax. In an email interview, Shi-Ling Hsu, the Larson Professor of Law at the Florida State University College of Law and author of “The Case for a Carbon Tax: Getting Past our Hang-ups to Effective Climate Policy,” discussed the role of carbon taxes in national climate change policies. WPR: What successful steps have governments taken around the world to limit carbon emissions, either through a carbon tax or other regulations? Shi-Ling Hsu: Governments have taken a wide variety of steps to limit greenhouse gas emissions, but most have been […]

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