Why America Will Face Even Deadlier Insurgents in the Future

Why America Will Face Even Deadlier Insurgents in the Future
A construction worker walks amid a cloud of dust as a bulldozer removes debris from destroyed shops in Mosul, Iraq, Nov. 18, 2017 (AP photo by Felipe Dana).

The United States, especially the American military, hates counterinsurgency. It is ethically and politically difficult, at times impossibly so. To do it, American troops and government officials must prod a problematic ally to undertake deep reforms while facing off against an often ruthless enemy. Terrorism, assassination, subversion and sabotage are persistent and more common than the type of pitched but conventional battles that the U.S. military prefers, in which it can assert its technological advantages. Whenever the United States becomes involved in counterinsurgency, it eventually wishes that it hadn’t. As Judah Grunstein wrote this week, the recent counterinsurgency campaigns in […]

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