Why a New U.N. Report Won’t Reduce International Support for Myanmar’s Military

Myanmar military officers march during a parade to mark the 74th Armed Forces Day in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, March 27, 2019 (AP photo by Aung Shine Oo).
Myanmar military officers march during a parade to mark the 74th Armed Forces Day in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, March 27, 2019 (AP photo by Aung Shine Oo).

Last week, the United Nations’ independent fact-finding mission on Myanmar released a new report that documents the economic interests of the Myanmar military and the global network of countries and companies that are financing the country’s genocidal “clearance operations” against the Rohingya, a predominantly Muslim ethnic minority. The report urged U.N. member states to impose an arms embargo on Myanmar and financial sanctions on the country’s military-owned companies. But according to David Scott Mathieson, a Yangon-based independent analyst who focuses on a range of human rights, conflict and peace issues in Myanmar, the mission’s findings are unlikely to significantly alter […]

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