What Trump, and Many Americans, Don’t Get About U.S.-Mexico Ties

What Trump, and Many Americans, Don’t Get About U.S.-Mexico Ties
Erik Lopez, dressed as "Captain Mexico," stands in front of police officers while protesting Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, Burlingame, California, April 29, 2016 (AP photo by Eric Risberg).

In this week’s Trend Lines podcast, WPR’s editor-in-chief, Judah Grunstein, and host Peter Dörrie discuss Thailand’s new anti-democratic constitution, Zambia’s tense presidential election campaign, and Guatemala’s fight against corruption six months into Jimmy Morales’ presidency. In the Report, Carin Zissis looks at Mexico’s image problem—and its implications for U.S. ties—in the context of Donald Trump’s bellicose campaign rhetoric. Listen: Download: MP3Subscribe: iTunes | RSS Relevant Articles on WPR: Thailand’s Junta Cements Control as Voters Approve New Constitution Zambia Goes to the Polls Amid Government Crackdown and Fears of Fraud Guatemala’s Anti-Corruption Fight Goes On, Despite Morales’ Flaws The Trump Effect: […]

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