What the End of the Qatar Boycott Means for the Gulf

Secretary General of the Gulf Cooperation Council, or GCC, Nayef Falah Al-Hajraf, left, and Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al-Saud at the 41st GCC meeting in Al Ula, Saudi Arabia, Jan. 5, 2021 (AP photo by Amr Nabil).
Secretary General of the Gulf Cooperation Council, or GCC, Nayef Falah Al-Hajraf, left, and Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Faisal bin Farhan Al-Saud at the 41st GCC meeting in Al Ula, Saudi Arabia, Jan. 5, 2021 (AP photo by Amr Nabil).
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Flights between Saudi Arabia and Qatar are resuming this week and the land border has reopened between the two countries—signs of a thaw in relations after three and half years of acrimony. Last week, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt agreed to end a travel and trade blockade they had imposed on Qatar in 2017. Those four countries, calling themselves the “anti-terror quartet,” had accused Qatar of supporting radical Islamist groups, among other charges. The crisis had divided the six-member Gulf Cooperation Council, or GCC, and the United States had lobbied extensively for an end to the […]

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