What’s Really Standing in the Way of European Strategic Autonomy

French Defense Minister Florence Parly, center left, speaks with German Defense Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, center right, during a meeting of NATO defense ministers at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Oct. 21, 2021 (AP photo by Virginia Mayo).
French Defense Minister Florence Parly, center left, speaks with German Defense Minister Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, center right, during a meeting of NATO defense ministers at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Oct. 21, 2021 (AP photo by Virginia Mayo).

The NATO defense ministers who met yesterday and today in Brussels had a long list of issues to discuss, from the alliance’s role in confronting a rising China to its plans for countering a resurgent Russia. But NATO is also confronting more fundamental questions about its identity that have taken on greater resonance in recent months. Prominent among those questions is what Europe can and should do for itself to provide for its security and defense. The idea of European strategic autonomy, or reduced dependence on the United States for security, is currently associated with French President Emmanuel Macron, one of its most […]

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