What’s Next for Morocco’s Political ‘Blockage’ After Prime Minister’s Ouster?

Morocco's current and former prime ministers, Saadeddine Othmani and Abdelilah Benkirane, applaud during a campaign meeting, Rabat, Morocco, September 25, 2016 (AP photo Abdeljalil Bounhar).
Morocco's current and former prime ministers, Saadeddine Othmani and Abdelilah Benkirane, applaud during a campaign meeting, Rabat, Morocco, September 25, 2016 (AP photo Abdeljalil Bounhar).
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Earlier this month, Mohamed Daadaoui wrote in WPR that Morocco’s political impasse suggested the monarchy was growing frustrated with the experiment—undertaken after the 2011 Arab uprisings—that allowed the country’s leading Islamist party to assume nominal governmental power. Last week, that signal became clearer with King Mohammed VI’s decision to oust the party’s leader, Abdelilah Benkirane, from his post as prime minister. On Friday, Mohammed VI tapped former Foreign Minister Saadeddine Othmani—another top figure in the party, known as the Justice and Development Party, or PJD—to form a new government. The PJD endorsed the appointment over the weekend. Mohammed VI’s removal […]

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