What Else Is at Stake in the U.S. Election: the Supreme Court’s Legitimacy

President Donald Trump greets Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts before delivering his State of the Union address, in Washington, Feb. 4, 2020 (Pool photo by Leah Millis via AP Images).
President Donald Trump greets Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts before delivering his State of the Union address, in Washington, Feb. 4, 2020 (Pool photo by Leah Millis via AP Images).

Say goodbye to sleep, world, because it’s going to be nothing but fever dreams until noon on Jan. 20, 2021, when the United States holds its presidential inauguration. If you thought America looked crazy from afar the past few years, amid all the chaos of Donald Trump’s presidency, just wait until you see what one of the most punishing political contests in its history does to the psyches of 328 million people. Before Tuesday, it might have been tempting to think that the U.S. would rest a little easier after the presidential polls closed and all the votes were counted. […]

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