What Does the Rise of Cyril Ramaphosa Mean for South Africa’s Opposition?

Members of South Africa’s opposition Economic Freedom Fighters party walk out of parlaiment in protest, Cape Town, South Africa, Feb 15, 2018 (AP photo by Rodger Bosch).
Members of South Africa’s opposition Economic Freedom Fighters party walk out of parlaiment in protest, Cape Town, South Africa, Feb 15, 2018 (AP photo by Rodger Bosch).

On Feb. 16, South Africa’s new president and head of the ruling African National Congress party, Cyril Ramaphosa, delivered his first state of the nation address, which was sharply criticized by the country’s political opposition parties. After finding it easy to capitalize on the scandal-plagued presidency of former President Jacob Zuma, the opposition had its first opportunity to challenge Ramaphosa on his own policies, which were previously not well known. In an email interview, James Hamill, a lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Relations at the University of Leicester and expert on South Africa, discusses the current state […]

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