What Does the Opposition’s Victory in Istanbul Mean for Turkey’s U.S. Ties?

Thousands of supporters surround a bus from where Ekrem Imamoglu, the new mayor of Istanbul from Turkey’s main opposition opposition Republican People’s Party, makes a speech after he took over office, in Istanbul, June 27, 2019 (AP photo by Emrah Gurel).
Thousands of supporters surround a bus from where Ekrem Imamoglu, the new mayor of Istanbul from Turkey’s main opposition opposition Republican People’s Party, makes a speech after he took over office, in Istanbul, June 27, 2019 (AP photo by Emrah Gurel).

A maxim among Turkey’s political strategists is that the road to Ankara starts in Istanbul. Turkey’s largest city accounts for one-third of the country’s economy and is home to a quarter of its population. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, whose meteoric political rise began while he was the city’s mayor in the 1990s, knows it as well as anyone. He himself has often remarked that “whoever wins Istanbul also wins the country.” That is why Erdogan applied pressure to dubiously contest the results of March’s mayoral election, which his handpicked candidate, former Prime Minister Binali Yildirim, lost to Ekrem Imamoglu of […]

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