What Did Egypt Get Out of Going Along With the Qatar Blockade?

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi attends a summit of Gulf Arab leaders in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, May 30, 2019 (AP photo by Amr Nabil).
Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi attends a summit of Gulf Arab leaders in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, May 30, 2019 (AP photo by Amr Nabil).
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Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Managing Editor Frederick Deknatel highlights a major unfolding story in the Middle East, while curating some of the best news and analysis from the region. Subscribers can adjust their newsletter settings to receive Middle East Memo by email every week. It wasn’t ever that clear why Egypt was going along with the Saudi- and Emirati-led blockade of Qatar, beyond some well-known disagreements over the Muslim Brotherhood. After all, the blockade was ultimately an economic pressure campaign by those two very wealthy Gulf monarchies, with the help of fellow Gulf Cooperation Council member Bahrain, to isolate their […]

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