What Could Trump’s Russia Policy Actually Look Like?

Russian President Vladimir Putin during a ceremony receiving diplomatic credentials from foreign ambassadors in the Kremlin, Moscow, Nov. 9, 2016 (AP photo by Sergei Karpukhin).
Russian President Vladimir Putin during a ceremony receiving diplomatic credentials from foreign ambassadors in the Kremlin, Moscow, Nov. 9, 2016 (AP photo by Sergei Karpukhin).

Russia featured prominently in the 2016 presidential campaign. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton depicted alleged Russian hacking of the Democratic National Committee’s email servers and other high-profile political targets, including her own campaign staff, as evidence of a Kremlin plot to harm her candidacy and promote her Republican opponent, now President-elect Donald Trump. Trump consistently dismissed Clinton’s allegations as desperate political mudslinging and put forward a very different set of ideas for U.S. relations with Russia. One early Russia-related dustup came in response to Russian President Vladimir Putin’s ambiguously translated comment that Trump was a “bright” or “colorful” candidate. Trump, in […]

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