What Can the U.S. Do to Counter the Islamic State’s Brutality?

What Can the U.S. Do to Counter the Islamic State’s Brutality?
Iraqi security forces backed by Shiite and Sunni pro-government fighters celebrate as they hold a flag of the Islamic State militant group they captured in Anbar University in Ramadi, Anbar province, Iraq, July 26, 2015 (AP photo).

Editor’s Note: This is the second of a two-part column on the Islamic State’s use of extreme brutality as part of its strategy. Part I looked at the roots and intended effects of that brutality. Part II examines whether extreme brutality is sustainable or will be the group’s downfall, and what that means for the U.S.-led coalition fighting the Islamic State. The past week brought another example of the deranged brutality of the so-called Islamic State. In this case, a video surfaced showing the extremists burning alive four prisoners from a Shiite militia group. Far from an anomaly, this was […]

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