What a Border Spat Reveals About Shifting Positions in the Horn of Africa

Djibouti President Ismail Omar Guelleh arrives to attend the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, Maryland, Aug. 3, 2014 (AP photo by Cliff Owen).
Djibouti President Ismail Omar Guelleh arrives to attend the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, Maryland, Aug. 3, 2014 (AP photo by Cliff Owen).
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Just weeks after sending troops to its first overseas military base in the tiny East African nation of Djibouti, China has come forward with a curious offer: to dive headlong into a dispute that illustrates the complex rivalries of the Horn of Africa region. In an interview with the Associated Press published July 21, Kuang Weilin, China’s ambassador to the African Union (AU), said China would consider sending peacekeeping troops to a border area contested by Djibouti and Eritrea. The dispute over the area, known as Ras Doumeira, dates back to the late 19th century, when Eritrea was colonized by […]

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