Wary of NATO, Russia Loses Sight of China’s Advances in the Arctic

Sunset in the Arctic, Oct. 14, 2011 (photo by Flickr user MarineBugs licensed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license).
Sunset in the Arctic, Oct. 14, 2011 (photo by Flickr user MarineBugs licensed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license).

In a bid to protect its own interests in the Arctic, and wary of NATO’s growing attention to the region, Russia is set to reactivate former Soviet-era bases around the North Pole. But the Kremlin would do well to monitor the actions in the Arctic of its occasional partner and possible future rival, China, rather than those of its trans-Atlantic adversary. With global warming melting ice and making northern sea routes more passable, both Arctic and non-Arctic nations are competing for access to the mineral, hydrocarbon and fishing resources estimated to lie under the North Pole. The race is on, […]

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