Voting and Protest Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic

Voting and Protest Amid the Coronavirus Pandemic
A protester waves the Israeli national flag during a demonstration against Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Tel Aviv, Israel, April 19, 2020 (AP photo by Oded Balilty).

In this week’s editors’ discussion on Trend Lines, WPR’s Judah Grunstein, Elliot Waldman and Prachi Vidwans talk about the deal struck between Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his nemesis over the past year, the Blue and White party’s Benny Gantz, to form an emergency government. Gantz justified his decision to break his repeated promises to never form a government with Netanyahu by the need for national unity to tackle the country’s coronavirus outbreak. Judah, Elliot and Prachi also discuss the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on recent elections in South Korea and the U.S., as well as its broader implications for electoral democracies around the world.

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Relevant Articles on WPR:
Could the Coronavirus Finally Break Israel’s Political Deadlock?
Why Israel’s Third Election in Less Than a Year Is Still a Referendum on Netanyahu
How to Protect Democratic Institutions During the Coronavirus Pandemic
Trump’s Anti-Immigrant Crackdown Is Creating New Coronavirus Hotspots
‘The Soldier Is Here to Defend You.’ Latin America’s Militarized Response to COVID-19
In Canada, Infrastructure Projects Are Endangering Indigenous Women and Children

Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie.

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