Turkey Takes Pragmatic Approach to International Peacekeeping

A Turkish member of the U.N. peacekeeping force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) stands in his sentry box at the entrance of the Turkish Engineer Construction Company stationed near the southern port city of Tyre, Nov. 16, 2006 (AP photo by Burhan Ozbilici).
A Turkish member of the U.N. peacekeeping force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) stands in his sentry box at the entrance of the Turkish Engineer Construction Company stationed near the southern port city of Tyre, Nov. 16, 2006 (AP photo by Burhan Ozbilici).
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In November 2014, Turkey announced plans to send peacekeepers to participate in U.N.-backed missions in the Central African Republic and Mali. In an email interview, Nil S. Satana, assistant professor at Bilkent University in Ankara and research affiliate at the START Center at the University of Maryland, College Park, discussed Turkey’s contributions to international peacekeeping missions. WPR: In what capacity has Turkey contributed to European Union peacekeeping missions, and how does Turkey decide whether or not to participate in a given mission? Nil S. Satana: In compliance with its framework agreement for participation in EU crisis management operations signed in […]

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