Turkey’s Snap Elections No Longer Look Like a Cakewalk for Erdogan

Turkey’s Snap Elections No Longer Look Like a Cakewalk for Erdogan
Supporters of Muharrem Ince, the presidential candidate for the opposition Republican People’s Party, or CHP, during a rally, Ankara, Turkey, June 5, 2018 (AP photo by Burhan Ozbilici).

On June 24, Turkish voters will head to the polls for presidential and parliamentary elections that are being held approximately 15 months ahead of schedule. Popular wisdom among many Turkey watchers is that President Recep Tayyip Erdogan chose to call the elections early, back in April, because economic headwinds could worsen in the coming year, making it more risky to wait until November 2019, when the elections were originally due to take place. The stakes of this month’s vote are enormous. The elections are the last step before Turkey formally transitions to an executive presidential system of government, which Erdogan […]

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