Turkey’s Election Puts Erdogan’s Foreign Policy in the Crosshairs

Turkey’s Election Puts Erdogan’s Foreign Policy in the Crosshairs
Kemal Kilicdaroglu, leader of Turkey's main opposition Republican People’s Party, speaks during a meeting in Ankara, Turkey, June 15, 2015 (AP photo).

Among the many questions left unanswered by the surprise results of Turkey’s recent parliamentary elections are whether and how the country’s foreign policy will change now that the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) has lost its ability to single-handedly control the legislature. On June 7, Turkish voters delivered a stunning blow to the AKP and its founder, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. After having handed him more than a decade of landslide victories, voters denied Erdogan the two-thirds supermajority that would have opened the way for the AKP to rewrite the constitution without submitting it to a referendum, making Erdogan […]

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