Trump May Threaten a Trade War Over NAFTA, but His Options Are Limited

A worker loads rolls of sheet metal at LMS International, a distribution company in Laredo, Texas, Nov. 21, 2016 (AP photo by Eric Gay).
A worker loads rolls of sheet metal at LMS International, a distribution company in Laredo, Texas, Nov. 21, 2016 (AP photo by Eric Gay).

When then-President Bill Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement in a White House ceremony in December 1993, he called it “a defining moment” for the United States and praised Mexico and Canada as “our partners in the future that we are trying to make together.” All three countries had made what then seemed like an irreversible decision to marry their economic futures. Yet today, less than a quarter-century later, those bonds are badly fraying. The new U.S. president, Donald Trump, wants to renegotiate NAFTA, which he has called “the worst trade deal in history.” Mexican President Enrique Pena […]

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