The U.N. Is Caught in a Trap as Kabila Angles for Third Term in DRC

U.N. peacekeepers on patrol with Congolese soldiers near Tongo, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, March 19, 2014 (U.N. photo by Sylvain Liechti).
U.N. peacekeepers on patrol with Congolese soldiers near Tongo, eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, March 19, 2014 (U.N. photo by Sylvain Liechti).
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There will be a major crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) before the end of 2016, and nobody really knows what to do about it. This is neither an alarmist nor even a particularly contentious statement. Diplomats, United Nations officials and independent analysts agree that trouble is looming over the DRC’s presidential election, which is supposed to take place in November. The constitution bars the sitting president, Joseph Kabila, from running for a third term. However, almost all observers believe he intends to cling onto power, potentially unleashing serious violence. Nobody can predict exactly how ugly this could […]

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