Myanmar’s Struggle for Democracy Was Never Just About Aung San Suu Kyi

Burmese living in Thailand hold pictures of Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi during a protest in front of the Myanmar Embassy, in Bangkok, Thailand, Feb. 1, 2021 (AP photo by Sakchai Lalit).
Burmese living in Thailand hold pictures of Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi during a protest in front of the Myanmar Embassy, in Bangkok, Thailand, Feb. 1, 2021 (AP photo by Sakchai Lalit).
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When news started filtering out of Myanmar that the internet was dropping, troops were patrolling the streets of major cities, and Aung San Suu Kyi—the country’s civilian leader, who was once viewed in the West as a hero of democracy—had been taken into custody, the situation posed a quandary. Burma, as the country is also known, was in the midst of a coup. But how should the world respond? A decade ago, Suu Kyi was a shining star. But today, she is known as a defender of ethnic cleansing and perhaps even genocide. Should democracies forcefully demand her release, or […]

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