The Rise of Twitter Diplomacy Is Making the World More Dangerous

President Donald Trump looks at his phone during a roundtable with governors at the White House, Washington, June 18, 2020 (AP photo by Alex Brandon).
President Donald Trump looks at his phone during a roundtable with governors at the White House, Washington, June 18, 2020 (AP photo by Alex Brandon).
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In mid-July, 130 high-profile Twitter accounts were hijacked by a small group of hackers, apparently led by a teenager in central Florida. They were able to take over some of the social media service’s most prominent handles—including those of Kanye West, Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk—and use them to scam hundreds of people out of a combined $118,000 in bitcoin. It was the biggest security breach in Twitter’s history, and a stunning embarrassment for the company. The hack also entailed a high level of risk to users’ personal security. According to Twitter, the hackers were able to not only send […]

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