The Limits of Being Right, and the Costs of Being Wrong, on the Iran Deal

President Donald Trump before delivering a statement from the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House withdrawing the U.S. from the Iran nuclear deal, Washington, May 8, 2018 (AP photo by Evan Vucci).
President Donald Trump before delivering a statement from the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House withdrawing the U.S. from the Iran nuclear deal, Washington, May 8, 2018 (AP photo by Evan Vucci).
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In politics, as in marital disputes, being right is overrated. That lesson was learned the hard way by defenders of the Iran nuclear deal, which President Donald Trump formally pulled the United States out of yesterday. No one, even among the deal’s most ardent supporters, disputes the claim that the agreement is flawed and imperfect from an American perspective. After all, it required compromises and concessions that were necessary to reach a negotiated, rather than an imposed, final agreement. Whether or not those concessions were too generous is a valid subject of debate. It is possible, though unprovable, that Iran […]

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