The EU’s Best Hope for Survival

Migrants and refugees walk toward the Serbian border with Hungary near Batajnica, Serbia, Oct. 4, 2016 (AP photo by Darko Vojinovic).
Migrants and refugees walk toward the Serbian border with Hungary near Batajnica, Serbia, Oct. 4, 2016 (AP photo by Darko Vojinovic).

Nero famously fiddled while Rome burned. When it comes to the European Union, its leaders don’t even bother to treat us to music. Confronted with multiple crises on fronts both external and domestic, they seem content to drift nonchalantly toward the abyss. The question is not so much whether the EU as we know it will survive; it is already irrevocably altered by Brexit. The question is whether the ideals that the union has historically championed will continue to have any relevance in today’s political landscape in Europe and the world. The list of Europe’s many crises is well known, […]

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