The Dirty Business Behind Bolivia’s Clean Energy Plans

People, one carrying a Bolivian flag, in a boat at the Isiboro river, on the outskirts of San Miguelito, part of the Tipnis reserve, Bolivia, July 29, 2012 (AP photo by Juan Karita).
People, one carrying a Bolivian flag, in a boat at the Isiboro river, on the outskirts of San Miguelito, part of the Tipnis reserve, Bolivia, July 29, 2012 (AP photo by Juan Karita).
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La Paz, BOLIVIA—President Evo Morales wants Bolivia to become the “energy heart of Latin America,” producing many times more electricity than it consumes and exporting it all across the continent. The key to these grand ambitions will be hydroelectric power, with several megaprojects planned. But these dams are proving controversial for their social, environmental and economic consequences—and for the way the government is trying to push them through. There are three main projects at different stages of development. The Rio Madera complex is a set of four dams in the northeast of the country, near the border with Brazil; two […]

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