The Consequences of Israel and Egypt’s Alliance of Convenience Against ISIS

A burned truck outside al-Rawdah mosque a day after a terrorist attack killed hundreds of worshipers, northern Sinai, Egypt, Nov. 25, 2017 (AP photo by Tarek Samy).
A burned truck outside al-Rawdah mosque a day after a terrorist attack killed hundreds of worshipers, northern Sinai, Egypt, Nov. 25, 2017 (AP photo by Tarek Samy).

Egypt and Israel have a shared interest in the defeat of the self-proclaimed Islamic State’s Egyptian affiliate. But when that offshoot—which calls itself Wilayat Sinai, or Sinai Province—is snuffed out, what happens next in Egypt’s restive Sinai Peninsula is unclear, and the interests of these allies of convenience begin to diverge. Since 2011, jihadi militants in Egypt’s North Sinai governorate, who declared their allegiance to the Islamic State in November 2014, have threatened the security of both Egypt and Israel. Before joining the Islamic State, one of the jihadis’ goals was driving a wedge between the two neighboring states. Through […]

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