The Anti-Airport Movement Has Gone Global

Demonstrators in Western France protest against a project to build an international airport in Notre-Dame-des-Landes, near Nantes, Nov. 17, 2012 (AP photo by David Vincent).
Demonstrators in Western France protest against a project to build an international airport in Notre-Dame-des-Landes, near Nantes, Nov. 17, 2012 (AP photo by David Vincent).
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On Oct. 14, just two weeks before the start of the United Nations’ Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, an unusual organization commemorated its fifth anniversary: Stay Grounded. The group, founded in 2016, is an international activist network of more than 170 smaller protest movements from across the globe. Through “mutual support and exchange of experiences,” it hopes to inspire and guide collaboration around the shared goal that brings its members together—namely, reducing “aviation and its negative impacts.” In the years since Stay Grounded started work, it has made a case for seeing anti-airport social movements as a truly global phenomenon. […]

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