Thailand’s Elections Foreshadow a New Divide, Without Healing Old Ones

Thailand’s prime minister, Prayuth Chan-ocha, casts his vote at a polling station in Bangkok, Thailand, March 24, 2019 (AP photo by Gemunu Amarasinghe).
Thailand’s prime minister, Prayuth Chan-ocha, casts his vote at a polling station in Bangkok, Thailand, March 24, 2019 (AP photo by Gemunu Amarasinghe).
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In Thailand’s elections on March 24, the military’s proxy party, Palang Pracharath, performed better than pre-election surveys had indicated, finishing with 8.4 million votes, the most of any party. Combined with its seats in the unelected upper house, which is stacked with pro-military allies, Palang Pracharath should control enough seats to ensure that Prayuth Chan-ocha, who has led a military junta governing the country since 2014, will become prime minister again. Pheu Thai, the populist party aligned with exiled former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, finished second with 7.9 million votes, but won the greatest number of the 350 constituency-based seats […]

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