The USS Lake Champlain.

For more than a century, the ability to project naval strength on a massive scale has been the crucial lynchpin of U.S. global hegemony. Yet a structural crisis that is now overwhelming the U.S. Navy presents as much of a threat to Washington’s geopolitical position as the isolationist populism fueled by the rise of Donald Trump.

A U.S. marine displays a solar-powered drone.

Against the backdrop of the Maui wildfires, U.S. President Joe Biden is facing renewed calls to declare a climate emergency but has been hedging on whether to do so for political reasons. But Biden is overlooking an untapped source of political capital that would ease the declaration of a climate emergency: the U.S. military.

The US Navy has developed a new strategy to counter China's growing military presence in the Indo-Pacific region, which involves deploying a larger and more technologically advanced fleet to maintain a strong military presence.

After decades of insufficient funding, misguided investments and poor strategic planning, the U.S. has allowed its position of maritime superiority in the Indo-Pacific to slip away. As a result, China has seized the initiative to threaten not only the United States’ military position in the region, but its economic status as well.

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