Struggles Facing China’s LGBT Community Go Far Beyond Marriage

Struggles Facing China’s LGBT Community Go Far Beyond Marriage
LGBT rights campaigners act out electric shock treatment as part of a protest, Beijing, July 31, 2014 (AP photo by Ng Han Guan).

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an ongoing WPR series on LGBT rights and discrimination in various countries around the world. The recent court ruling paving the way for same-sex marriage in Taiwan prompted speculation about similar measures elsewhere in Asia. It was unclear, though, whether the ruling would help or hinder the same-sex marriage cause in China. Still, Chinese activists have been scoring victories of their own, among them increased cultural visibility and heightened popular awareness of the harms caused by “conversion therapy.” On Thursday, a court in the city of Guiyang ruled in favor of a transgender […]

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