Sizing Up Biden’s U.N. Diplomacy and Guterres’ Second Term

Linda Thomas-Greenfield, right, now U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and then-President-elect Joe Biden, in Wilmington, Delaware, Nov. 24, 2020 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).
Linda Thomas-Greenfield, right, now U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and then-President-elect Joe Biden, in Wilmington, Delaware, Nov. 24, 2020 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).

During his first few months in office, President Joe Biden has largely followed through on his pledges to restore a more multilateralist U.S. foreign policy, rejoining a number of key international organizations and agreements that had been abandoned by his predecessor, Donald Trump. This new approach has come as a relief to many senior officials at the United Nations, particularly Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, who was nominated for a second term by the U.N. Security Council this week and is expected to cruise to reelection. This week on Trend Lines, Richard Gowan, the U.N. director at the International Crisis Group and […]

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