Shielded by U.S. Alliance, Bahrain Suspends Shiite Opposition

Shielded by U.S. Alliance, Bahrain Suspends Shiite Opposition
A man walks past by the al-Wefaq party’s headquarters in Manama, Bahrain, Oct. 28, 2014 (AP photo by Hasan Jamali).

On Tuesday, a court in Bahrain suspended the activities of the country’s main Shiite opposition group, al-Wefaq, ahead of next month’s parliamentary elections. The group, known in Bahrain as a political society, cannot organize rallies, issue statements or use its offices for three months. Al-Wefaq had already announced earlier this month that it would boycott the Nov. 22 poll, so the immediate impact on the election may be limited. The Ministry of Justice filed a lawsuit against al-Wefaq seeking its suspension back in July, after the government expelled Tom Malinowski, the U.S. assistant secretary of state for democracy, human rights […]

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