How India Fails Its Rape Survivors

Indian women hold candles and posters during a protest against two recently reported rape cases, in Ahmadabad, India, April 16, 2018 (AP photo by Ajit Solanki).
Indian women hold candles and posters during a protest against two recently reported rape cases, in Ahmadabad, India, April 16, 2018 (AP photo by Ajit Solanki).

MUMBAI, India—In December 2012, in a case that generated international headlines, a 23-year-old physical therapy student was gang-raped by six men on a bus in New Delhi. After 45 minutes of torture, the woman—dubbed Nirbhaya, or fearless, by the Indian press, which is prohibited by law from naming victims of sexual assault—was thrown off the bus. Found in critical condition, she died of her injuries in a Singapore hospital less than two weeks later. The tragedy brought national and international attention to the issue of sexual violence in India. Following Nirbhaya’s death, then-Prime Minister Manmohan Singh declared, “While she may […]

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