Russia Needs Immigrants but Lacks a Coherent Immigration Policy

Municipal workers at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia, June 26, 2018 (AP photo by Alexander Zemlianichenko). The role of immigrants in the labor force is an unresolved question of Russia's immigration policy.
Municipal workers at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia, June 26, 2018 (AP photo by Alexander Zemlianichenko). The role of immigrants in the labor force is an unresolved question of Russia's immigration policy.
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Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series on immigration policy around the world. Like many other advanced economies, Russia faces serious demographic challenges in the coming decades. According to government projections, the population is expected to shrink by 2.5 million people by 2035, and the active working-age population will likely decrease by 3.1 million people. Russian federal and state authorities recognize the need to hold these trends in check by keeping the country’s doors open, but immigrants, particularly migrant workers, often have trouble accessing social services and must navigate a complex patchwork of rules and regulations in order […]

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