Rising Tensions Between Greece and Turkey Could Weaken NATO

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras speaks during a joint news conference with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Athens, Greece, Dec. 7, 2017 (AP photo by Thanassis Stavrakis).
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras speaks during a joint news conference with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Athens, Greece, Dec. 7, 2017 (AP photo by Thanassis Stavrakis).
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On March 16, a Greek appeals court denied an extradition request by Turkey for eight Turkish soldiers who fled to Greece in July 2016, following the failed coup attempt against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. It was the third such rejection by Greek courts, which say the men could face an unfair trial in Turkey. The fate of the servicemen, whom Turkey accuses of being involved in the attempted coup, has been a source of escalating tensions between Greece and Turkey, two NATO allies. In an email interview, Simon Waldman, a visiting research fellow in the Department of Middle Eastern Studies […]

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